SESYNC’s Public Health Immersion Workshop: Interdisciplinary Themes of Resilience and Social Determinants of Health

By: Lauren White Original post: https://www.sesync.org/news/tue-2020-02-25-1935/sesync%E2%80%99s-public-health-immersion-workshop-interdisciplinary-themes-of In a recent Immersion workshop on public health, SESYNC postdocs had the opportunity to interact with three public health scholars whose research programs span environmental exposure, feedbacks between human health and sustainability, and mental health and cognition. During the two-day workshop, these scholars covered a range of topics—beginning withContinue reading “SESYNC’s Public Health Immersion Workshop: Interdisciplinary Themes of Resilience and Social Determinants of Health”

“We All Have Bad First Drafts”: Lessons from a Professional Science Writer

By: Lauren White and Alaina Gallagher Original post: https://www.sesync.org/news/fri-2019-12-20-1713/%E2%80%9Cwe-all-have-bad-first-drafts%E2%80%9D-lessons-from-a-professional-science-writer “As a scientist, you are a professional writer,” said Dr. Joshua Schimel during a recent science writing workshop held at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC). During this event, SESYNC postdocs had the opportunity to immerse themselves in the storytelling process. Schimel, a professor at theContinue reading ““We All Have Bad First Drafts”: Lessons from a Professional Science Writer”

Three Lessons I Learned from Attending the 2019 Science Writers Conference as a Scientist

By: Lauren White Original post: https://www.sesync.org/news/wed-2019-11-27-1636/three-lessons-i-learned-from-attending-the-2019-science-writers-conference A doodle drawn by Lauren White during the ScienceWriters2019 conference. Lauren’s notes capture some of the literary devices used by Dr. Richard Alley, Evan Pugh University Professor of Geosciences and Associate of the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute at Penn State University during his talk on why understanding how quicklyContinue reading “Three Lessons I Learned from Attending the 2019 Science Writers Conference as a Scientist”

Modern Insights Into Plagues of Old

See original post: https://bit.ly/2Mh4xgv By: Lauren White One less commonly known plague of antiquity is the Antonine Plague (165-190 Common Era [CE]). According to some historians, the Antonine Plague spanned the entire Mediterranean region, killing between 10-50% of the Roman Empire. The Roman Emperor, Lucius Verus, and his co-regent Marcus Aurelius are two of thisContinue reading “Modern Insights Into Plagues of Old”